Cystic fibrosis-Children and adults Tai Chi study (CF CATS2): Can Tai Chi improve symptoms and quality of life for people with cystic fibrosis? Second phase study protocol.

Chin J Integr Med. 2015 May 26;

Authors: Lorenc A, Ronan P, Mian A, Madge S, Carr SB, Agent P, Robinson N

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disorder affecting respiratory and digestive systems. People with CF experience physical symptoms; cough, poor lung ventilation, recurrent infections, poor weight gain, diarrhoea, and malnutrition, as well as lower quality of life. Tai Chi, a Chinese form of meditative movement, may help with the symptoms of CF and help people with CF to exercise. However, there is very little research in this area.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the feasibility of studying Tai Chi for CF and to compare the effectiveness of Tai Chi to standard care and face-to-face Tai Chi with online Tai Chi for people with CF.

METHODS: This is a comparative effectiveness trial with 72 people with CF over 6 years old and a patient at the Royal Brompton Hospital, London, UK. Participants receive 8 Tai Chi sessions, then home practice with a DVD. Sessions are one-on-one for group A, online for group B. Group B is a no treatment standard care control (first 3 months). At baseline, 3, 6 and 9 months, questionnaires will be used to measure quality of life, mindfulness and sleep, and medical data health and respiratory function. At Tai Chi sessions and at 4 follow-up points, the Borg Scale and healthcare use data will be collected. At 9 months online focus groups will assess participants’ experience, Tai Chi feasibility, perceived health impact, and study participation. Recruitment will use adverts in hospital clinics and website, and letter/phone for non-regularly attending patients. Block randomisation will use random number tables. The two groups will be compared for: weeks 1 to 12 (Tai Chi vs. standard care); before and after intervention (differences in delivery method); week 1 (of intervention) to month 9 (long-term impact). Qualitative data will use Framework analysis.

DISCUSSION: We believe this is the first trial of Tai Chi for CF. Tai Chi may help with the physiological symptoms of CF and increase levels of exercise by providing a self-management technique and low stress activity. This study will provide data on the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial of Tai Chi for CF, including data for a sample size calculation and will inform future study design.

PMID: 26015075 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Effect of Tai Chi on muscle strength of the lower extremities in the elderly.

Chin J Integr Med. 2015 May 27;

Authors: Zhou M, Peng N, Dai Q, Li HW, Shi RG, Huang W

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Aging is associated with a progressive decline in muscle strength, muscle mass and impaired physical function, which reduces mobility and impairs quality of life in the elderly population. The 6-2 months of exercise can enhance the muscle strength, but these improvements can only be maintained for a short period. In this study, we investigated the effects of long-term Tai Chi (TC) exercise on muscle strength of lower extremities.

METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 205 long-term TC practitioners (age: 60-9 years) and 205 age and gentle matched controls who did not practice TC. Each of the activity group was further divided into three distinct age groups: G1, 60-9 years; G2, 70-9 years; and G3, 80-9 years. Hand-held dynamometery was used to measure the maximum isometric strength of iliopsoas, quadriceps femoris, tibialis anterior and hamstrings in both sides of the participants. Unpaired tests were performed to compare the difference of strength between the TC and non-Tai Chi (NTC) groups. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was used to compare the lower muscle strengths among the different age groups in the TC and NTC groups. Pearson’s correlations were used to quantify the linear relationship between the months of TC practice and lower limbs muscle strength.

RESULTS: The inter-rater reliabilities of iliopsoas, quadriceps femoris, tibialis anterior and hamstrings were intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) (1,1) = 0.895 (0.862-.920), ICC (2,2) = 0.905 (0.874-.928), ICC (3,3) = 0.922 (0.898-.941) and ICC (4,4) = 0.930 (0.908-.947). The strength of the muscles in the TC group did not differ among different age groups (P>0.05). The strength of iliopsoas, quadriceps femoris, tibialis anterior and hamstrings in TC group was higher than that in the NTC group (P<0.05). A correlation between muscle strength and extension of the exercise period was positive (P<0.05).

CONCLUSION: Results shed light on the orientation and magnitude of long-term TC in preventing muscle strength loss with aging. TC might be a good form to slow down the trend of age-related decline in muscle strength in community-dwelling population.

PMID: 26015074 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Reprogramming your DNA Qigong Meditation Workshop

May 27, 2015

Contact Person: Richard Leirer Contact Email Richard@RichardLeirer.org Contact Phone (575) 224-64 Event Title Reprogramming your DNA Qigong Meditation Workshop Event Location Cuyahoga Valley Environmental Education Center Cuyahoga Valley National Park, 3675 Oak Hill Rd Peninsula, OH 44264 Event Date 06/26/2015 to June 28 2015 Start Time 06:00 pm End Time 01:00 pm Web site with event info […]

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Application of a Three-Dimensional Reconstruction Technique in Liver Autotransplantation for End-Stage Hepatic Alveolar Echinococcosis.

May 15, 2015

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Protected: QiTalks: Francesco Garripoli – Qigong Meets Epigenetics

May 14, 2015

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0001 Keeping older adults independent: it takes a village.

April 29, 2015

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April 29, 2015

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Structural elucidation of two new megastigmane glycosides from the leaves of AquiAquilaria sinensi.

April 25, 2015

Structural elucidation of two new megastigmane glycosides from the leaves of AquiAquilaria sinensi. Chin J Nat Med. 2015 Apr;13(4):290-4 Authors: Sun J, Xia F, Wang S, Wang KY, Chen JM, Tu PF Abstract The present study was designed to determine the chemical constituents and identify new components of the leaves of Aquilaria sinensis (Lour.) Gilg. […]

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Medical Qigong for Self Health

April 24, 2015

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World Tai Chi Qigong Day – Philadelphia, PA

April 24, 2015

Contact Name Paul Martin Contact Email friendsoftheway@gmail.com Contact Phone 267-270-6108 Event Title World Tai Chi Qigong Day Event Location Valley Green Inn VALLEY GREEN ROAD Philadelphia, PA 19128 We will meet across from Valley Green Inn, along the beautiful Wissahickon Creek in Fairmount Park Event Date 04/25/15 Start Time 9:45 am End Time 11 am […]

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Alterations in brain gray matter structures in patients with Crohn's disease and their correlation with psychological distress.

April 22, 2015

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Exercise mode heterogeneity among reported studies of the qigong practice Baduanjin.

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The effectiveness of Tai Chi for patients with Parkinson's disease: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

April 16, 2015

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Protected: QiTalks: Mark Johnson – My Life, Playing with Qi

April 12, 2015

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