Effectiveness of Tai Chi on Physical and Psychological Health of College Students: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

PLoS One. 2015;10(7):e0132605

Authors: Zheng G, Lan X, Li M, Ling K, Lin H, Chen L, Tao J, Li J, Zheng X, Chen B, Fang Q

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effectiveness and safety of Tai Chi Chuan (TCC) on physical and psychological health of college students.

METHODS: Two hundred six college students were recruited and randomly allocated to a control group or a TCC exercise group in an equal ratio. Participants in the control group were instructed to maintain their original activity level and those in the TCC exercise group received 12 weeks of TCC exercise training based on their original activity level. Physical and psychological outcomes were evaluated at baseline, 13 weeks and 25 weeks. Intention-to-treat analysis was performed for the above outcomes.

RESULTS: Compared with the control group, the TCC exercise group showed significant improvements at the end of the 12-week intervention period for flexibility (length of Sit and Reach (cm): TCC group 14.09±7.40 versus control 12.88±6.57, P = 0.039 adjusted for its baseline measures using a general linear model) and balance ability (open eyes perimeter: TCC group 235.6(191~314) versus control 261(216~300); closed eyes perimeter: TCC group 370.5 (284~454) versus control 367 (293~483); P = 0.0414, 0.008, respectively, adjusted for corresponding baseline measures using a general linear model). No significant changes in other physical and mental outcomes were found between the two groups. No adverse events were reported during the study period.

CONCLUSION: TCC exercise was beneficial in college students for improving flexibility and balance capability to some extent, compared with usual exercise.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: Chinese Clinical Trial Registry ChiCTR-TRC-13003328.

PMID: 26147842 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Qigong as a Traditional Vegetative Biofeedback Therapy: Long-Term Conditioning of Physiological Mind-Body Effects.

Biomed Res Int. 2015;2015:531789

Authors: Matos LC, Sousa CM, Gonçalves M, Gabriel J, Machado J, Greten HJ

Abstract

A contemporary understanding of Chinese Medicine (CM) regards CM diagnosis as a functional vegetative state that may be treated by vegetative reflex therapies such as acupuncture. Within this context, traditional mind-body exercises such as Qigong can be understood as an attempt to enhance physiological proprioception, by combining a special state of “awareness” with posture, movement, and breath control. We have formerly trained young auditing flutists in “White Ball” Qigong to minimize anxiety-induced cold hands and lower anxiety-induced heart rate. Functional changes occurred 2-5 min after training and were observed over the whole training program, allowing the children to control their symptoms. In our current work, we report that warm fingers and calm hearts could be induced by the children even without Qigong exercises. Thus, these positive changes once induced and “conditioned” vegetatively were stable after weeks of training. This may show the mechanism by which Qigong acts as a therapeutic measure in disease: positive vegetative pathways may be activated instead of dysfunctional functional patterns. The positive vegetative patterns then may be available in critical stressful situations. Qigong exercise programs may therefore be understood as an ancient vegetative biofeedback exercise inducing positive vegetative functions which are added to the individual reactive repertoire.

PMID: 26137485 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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Simplified Tai Chi Resistance Training versus Traditional Tai Chi in Slowing Bone Loss in Postmenopausal Women.

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